Motorbike Vietnam – Day 1, loaded up with my new bike.

 

Motorbike Vietnam – Day 1, loaded up with my new bike.
Motorbike Vietnam – Day 1, loaded up with my new bike.

This is a step-by-step guide to buying and riding a motorbike around Vietnam, having done the trip myself in March 2015 and it being one of the best travel experiences I’ve had yet, I now want to share my tips with you incase your planning on embarking on a similar adventure.

Firstly, is it safe?

I think so, however if you do a google search you’ll find a lot people telling you it’s dangerous and you shouldn’t ride a motorbike in Vietnam, and I agree riding a motorbike in Vietnam can be dangerous, the traffic and roads are pretty crazy, but if your sensible, keep your wits about you and use common sense then I think you can ride around Vietnam safely.

The boys I started my trip with, Sol from Norway and Adam from Ireland
The boys I started my trip with, Sol from Norway and Adam from Ireland
This was taken on Day 1, with Sol and Maria
This was taken on Day 1, with Sol and Maria

What license will I need?

To legally ride in Vietnam and to be covered by your travel insurance you will need your motorbike license in your home country and an international drivers license.

(From what I’ve been told is that before 2015 Vietnam didn’t recognize international drivers licenses, but since then the rules have changed and they apparently now recognized international licenses… So I would advise before you do this trip that you double check with your insurance company about the licensing so that you know that you are covered…)

When is the best time to travel Vietnam on a motorbike?

The best time to ride is during the dry season, which is between the months of December and May (in particular between January and March having the best weather for riding) any other time and it will likely be raining a lot. I did the journey in March the weather was mostly sunny apart from it raining twice which was miserable, riding in the rain is no fun so you definitely want to avoid the wet season.

It looks like it’s about to rain so i’m ready for it with my $1 poncho.
It looks like it’s about to rain so i’m ready for it with my $1 poncho.
Fuck it’s raining… trying to stay dry with this dodgy poncho.
Fuck it’s raining… trying to stay dry with this dodgy poncho.

Where should you start? Ho Chi Minh or Hanoi?

I started in the Ho Chi Minh and I think this is the best starting point for a few reasons, firstly I noticed more backpackers were travelling from South to North, which meant as a solo traveller it was easier to find other people to ride with, and secondly once you arrive in Hanoi you have the option to continue exploring more of Vietnam and visit Sapa and Ha Long Bay, the only downside is that bikes are more expensive in Ho Chi Minh so when you sell it in Hanoi your definitely going to lose some money.

What bike should you buy?

I’d recommend ridding a motorbike instead of a scooter, I think they are more comfortable, better suited for longer journeys, and they look bad ass. If you are going to ride a scooter expect to get a hard time from your bike buddies, I constantly gave mine shit.

This leaves pretty much only one option and that is the Honda Win which is the most popular motorbike for backpackers to do this trip on, they are however getting trashed up and down the country all year round, so your going to end up having to spend money on repairs at some point, luckily you can find a mechanic literally everywhere and Honda win parts are cheap and always available.

This was my Honda Win, I took this photo a few hours after I bought it.
This was my Honda Win, I took this photo a few hours after I bought it.
My first breakdown happened after a week, it was a flat tire so nothing too serious
My first breakdown happened after a week, it was a flat tire so nothing too serious
The bike is back on the road and now i’m ridding smoothly into the sunset.. shaka’s brah.
The bike is back on the road and now i’m ridding smoothly into the sunset.. shaka’s brah.

How much will a Honda Win cost me?

The best place to start looking is by searching for motorbikes on Vietnam.craigslist.org as you’ll find both bike shops and travellers are selling on here, also take a walk around the backpacking district you’ll find plenty of flyers in hostels and a few bike shops in this area, it is also good to talk to other travellers and let them know your looking for a bike.

I checked out a few bikes that backpackers had advertised in hostels, and I also hired a motor-taxi to drive me around to all the mechanics in Ho Chi Minh that were selling Honda Wins which was only about 6 shops, I think I looked at about 10 bikes and test drove 4 bikes before I picked one I was happy with.

Welcome to the full gang… so we met a few other riders in Da Lat, so then we became 6 Alex, John, Dan, Myself, Sol & Adam
Welcome to the full gang… so we met a few other riders in Da Lat, so then we became 6 Alex, John, Dan, Myself, Sol & Adam
Some of the roads you drive in the country side are absolutely amazing
Some of the roads you drive in the country side are absolutely amazing
This is a… have we got everyone moment… 1,2,3,4,5 ahh we’re missing Sol
This is a… have we got everyone moment… 1,2,3,4,5 ahh we’re missing Sol
Filling up with petrol, you get about 40km on 1 litre, and 1 litre will cost about 22,000 dong.
Filling up with petrol, you get about 40km on 1 litre, and 1 litre will cost about 22,000 dong.

What should I look for when buying a bike?

Firstly check the lights are working (front light, break light, indicators), horn (you definitely need this), check how much tread is on the tire (are they new or are the worn out), now make sure you have the middle stand up so you can now spin the wheels to check the sprockets (spin the wheel around and make sure all the sprockets are there and that they are even and it looks smooth, if it looks sharp and the curves on the sprockets are uneven then it’s probably worn out) now check the chain (spin the chain around checking all the links and then grab the chain on the back sprocket in the middle and check if it is loose, if it is loose then it is probably starting to wear out as well) now take it for a test drive (test both the electric start and kick start) go for a drive for about 10 minutes to get a feel for how the bike rides (does the it change gears smoothly, what’s the clutch like, what’s the throttle like, check both the front and back breaks, does the engine run smoothly, are the wheels steady or does the back wheel wobble) now after your test drive you can now check to make sure the engine doesn’t leak oil after it has been for a ride.

It is hard to find a perfect bike, as most of them will have some problems that need fixing, the most important part of the bike is the engine as this will be the most expensive part to replace so make sure that runs smoothly and use my tips as a guide to help you find the best bike that is available.

At the bottom of the Hai Van Pass
At the bottom of the Hai Van Pass
Taking off to ride the Hai Van Pass
Taking off to ride the Hai Van Pass

Yes I wore a helmet, my GoPro is attached to it, which is what I used to take this photo.

The Hai Van Pass
The Hai Van Pass

Ownership Card (Blue Card)

Once you decide on which bike to get make sure you receive the Blue Card (Ownership Card) (mine is pictured below), it will have someone else’s name on it which is fine, you just need this for when you want to sell your bike, or if you want to attempt to cross the boarder into Laos or Cambodia with the bike.

motorbike registration certificate
Blue Card (Ownership Card)

Bike Riding Equipment

Helmet: It is the law to wear a helmet in Vietnam for both riders and passengers, most bikes will come with a helmet however I recommend spending some money and get yourself a new helmet that is of good quality, I spent about $60 on a new helmet, as I think protecting your head is important and you don’t want to be a cheapskate here.

Make sure you wear shoes, wearing flip-flops is not a good idea, it is also good idea to wear gloves, pants and a jacket this will help protect you if you have an accident, however despite knowing all and as you can see from all my photos I still wore shorts, a t-shirt and no gloves while I was riding, luckily I didn’t have any accidents as I would have got torn up if I hit the ground.

Bike Accessories

You need a lock which I advised you use whenever you park up your bike, some bungee cords, you’ll need at least 2 to strap your backpack down to your bike (I had 4 to be extra safe), a poncho to cover yourself and either a tarp or garbage bag to cover your backpack incase it rains, these all can be picked up at any hardware store.

We attempted to ride across this bridge into Hoi An, turns out it wasn’t finished yet.
We attempted to ride across this bridge into Hoi An, turns out it wasn’t finished yet.
Cheers for the photo bomb Alex
Cheers for the photo bomb Alex
Because the bridge wasn’t finished we ended up catching a ferry across to Hoi An.
Because the bridge wasn’t finished we ended up catching a ferry across to Hoi An
Hanging off the side of the boat hoping my bike doesn’t fall
Hanging off the side of the boat hoping my bike doesn’t fall

Will My Bike Breakdown?

Yes most likely, even when you think you’ve found a super smooth bike with no problems it is likely it’s going to breakdown at some point, out of the 5 other people I rode with not one of us got away without a breakdown of some sort, only 2 others had Honda Wins the other 3 had various types of scooters and they all had some problems along the way as well, so it doesn’t matter what bike you get your going to have some problems, I got lucky and only spent about $30 to fix a broken chain, dead battery, side stand and a tire tube, however I do know people who had lots of problems with their bikes and spent around $150 on repairs, and sometimes even more.

Bike Repairs and Maintenance

Bike shops are literally everywhere in Vietnam, the 2 times I broke down I was within 100 meters of a bike shop, look for a sign that says “Xe Máy” (motorbike in Vietnamese) or for a Honda logo as this will probably be a garage you can get repairs done at.

Throughout your trip you’ll also need to do some service stops, it is recommended to get your chain oiled every 300km and to get the oil changed every 500-700kms to keep the engine running smoothly, it will cost you between 80,000 -100,000 dong to get your oil changed

ahh ohh… someone has had a breakdown… having some snacks while we wait for Sol’s bike to get repaired…
ahh ohh… someone has had a breakdown… having some snacks while we wait for Sol’s bike to get repaired…
Still waiting… so Sol is now entertaining us while we wait for his bike to be fixed
Still waiting… so Sol is now entertaining us while we wait for his bike to be fixed
Found some poor guy who had a breakdown in the middle of nowhere so trying to help him out
Found some poor guy who had a breakdown in the middle of nowhere so trying to help him out

Where do you Stop Between Ho Chi Minh and Hanoi?

I’ve listed below the main cities you should visit in order below, this is where all the tour buses go to and where you’ll find other backpackers, activities to do and a party scene…

  1. Ho Chi Minh
  2. Mui Ne
  3. Da Lat
  4. Nha Trang
  5. Hoi An
  6. Da Nang
  7. Hue
  8. Phong Nha
  9. Hanoi.

I would advised you to follow a similar route and to also avoid highway one as much as possible, as it is busy with trucks and buses and it is definitely a lot more dangerous to drive on, the best route to take is Ho Chi Minh Trail (the Ho Chi Minh trail is the route the VietCong took to get supplies and support from the north down to the south during the Vietnam war) it is also a much safer and scenic drive.

On average you will drive about 200kms a day and this will take you around 8 hours as the roads aren’t the best and most of these bikes will comfortable cruise at around 60kms, some of the planned destinations are 400km or more apart so you just stop wherever you can find a hotel (khách san) or guest house (nhà nghì) knowing the Vietnamese name is helpful as it you wont see it written in English in the smaller towns.

As you can see on my map the places marked in red is where we stayed overnight, unless it was one of the popular cities I mentioned above then the only reason we stopped at these other small cities was because it was getting too dark to drive, or because it started raining or we were having bike problems.

These random unplanned stops along the way are amazing and this is where you get to experience another side to Vietnam, you see the local people who aren’t tainted by tourism they wouldn’t even think about ripping you of unlike in the touristic cities, the people in these villages are some of the friendliest Vietnamese people you’ll meet your entire trip, while your having dinner they will want to come over and share their food with you and share some of their local alcohol, while your walking the streets the kids will want to come over and have photos with you, this is stuff that you only get to experience when you travel by bike and end up in small cities that no tourist ever visit.

Trying to pull off a jumping shot in Mui Ne
Trying to pull off a jumping shot in Mui Ne
Canyoning in Dalat
Canyoning in Dalat
Exploring caves in Phong Nha
Exploring caves in Phong Nha
Getting filthy in the mud in Dark Cave in Phong Nha
Getting filthy in the mud in Dark Cave in Phong Nha
Zip Line in Phong Nha
Zip Line in Phong Nha

Navigating

The best way to navigate your way around the country is with your smart phone with GPS, download an app called maps.me and download the map for Vietnam, this works offline so you don’t even need to use data, however I also suggest you get a local simcard with data, I picked up unlimited internet for 1 month with some calling credit for about $20 which was good for using google maps, searching for places to stay and for keeping in contact with the others I was riding with as we often would lose each other while riding.

How long will Ho Chi Minh to Hanoi take?

If all you did was drive it would take about 9 days from Ho Chi Minh to Hanoi, but doing that would be ridiculous, I think you need about 5-6 weeks to comfortably explore Vietnam on a bike, about 4 weeks to travel from Ho Chi Minh to Hanoi and another 2 weeks to explore Sapa, Ha Long Bay, and Hanoi.

Group shot in Phong Nha
Group shot in Phong Nha

Should I checkout Sapa and Ha-Long Bay once I’ve made it to Hanoi?

Catching a ferry across to Cat Ba Island in Ha Long Bay.
Catching a ferry across to Cat Ba Island in Ha Long Bay.
This photo was taken in Sapa, about a week before I sold my bike
This photo was taken in Sapa, about a week before I sold my bike

Getting a Visa

Most visitors to Vietnam will need a Visa before they arrive, I think if you are doing a big trip around South East Asia and you are pretty flexible then I recommend just getting your Visa while your in Asia instead of getting it beforehand, that allows you to be a bit more flexible with your plans, it only took me 24hour to get my Visa when I was in Phomn Pen in Cambodia, keep in mind it will take longer if your not in a capital city and that you can’t apply over the weekend and during the Vietnamese public holidays

A 1 Month Visa will cost you $60 and a 3 month visa will cost you $90, without a doubt I think you should get the 3 month visa as you really do need 5-6 weeks to properly ride around Vietnam and immerse yourself in the culture, trying to do it in 4 weeks will be rushed and you’ll also be rushed into selling your bike and you’ll probably lose money here.

I however got the 1 month Visa when I did this trip but I soon realised while I was travelling that it wasn’t going to be long enough so I decided to extend my visa which wasn’t cheap, to get a 3 month Visa extension it cost me $170 and took 10 days to process, a 1 month visa extension will cost around $70 and will take only a few days to process, pretty much everyone I met riding wished they got the 3 month visa to start with as most of the people I met who were riding bikes decided to extended their visas, or just overstay their visa and cop a massive fine.

Photo with a bunch of Chinese tourists in Phong Nha
Photo with a bunch of Chinese tourists in Phong Nha

Selling the bike…

After having the most amazing travel experience its now time to sell your bike and move on, before you reach your final destination you can get it listed on Vietnam.craigslist.org and post the date it will be available, then once you arrive in your final destination make flyers and stick them up in the backpacking district, walk around with a sign taped to your shirt saying “bike for sale” whatever you do don’t let people know that your in a rush to sell it cause you have a flight or bus out of Vietnam the next day because they will just offer you the lowest price possible, I saw this happen a few times to other travellers trying to sell their bikes.

I posted my bike on craigslist but had the most success by riding around and talking to backpacker and letting people know I had a bike for sale, I bought my bike for $300 in Ho Chi Minh and sold it onto another backpacker I had met from walking around for $220, I spent about $30 on repairs, so all up it cost me about $110 for having a motorbike for 3 months while I was in Vietnam.

Beer Corner in Hanoi. 5,000 Dong for a beer thats 25 cents.
Beer Corner in Hanoi. 5,000 Dong for a beer thats 25 cents.
I worked at Hanoi Rocks for 6 weeks, here i am “working” hard at Beer Corner.
I worked at Hanoi Rocks for 6 weeks, here i am “working” hard at Beer Corner.
Last night with the motorbike gang, cheers for the good times boys
Last night with the motorbike gang, cheers for the good times boys

One Last thing…

Riding a motorbike across Vietnam has easily been the best travel experience I’ve had yet, I made life long friends that I shared amazing memories with, the freedom that you get from having with a motorbike is amazing, being able to go off and explore anything you want whenever you want is just the best, everyone I’ve met that has also ridden across Vietnam agrees and to be honest I’ve researched other countries I could explore on a motorbike, as I think it is the best mode of travel

Doing burnouts on the beach in Hoi An, fuck I loved this bike
Doing burnouts on the beach in Hoi An, fuck I loved this bike

from ho chi minh to ha noi motorbike vietnam

trip from ho chi minh to ha noi motor bike vietnam

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